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A method for uploading illustrated MS Word documents to KDP

If you have an Amazon KDP account, you can upload a Microsoft Word file of your book with the title page, copyright page, endorsements and the text directly to KDP as long as it does not contain illustrations.

If your Word file contains illustrations, such as a logo, maps, drawings, photographs or the like, you must take extra steps to create a file that can be uploaded to create a Kindle edition with all of those elements. This is one method that works for me. You will need to manipulate files, but this article will guide you through the process. These examples are from a Windows computer. If you are using another brand, you will have to use its control keys, applications and menu selection, such as pressing the Command key on a Macintosh instead of CTRL.

Create a Word file of your book and insert the images you want at the places where you want them to appear. Here is a pretend novel with some photographs.


Not exactly a best seller, but it will suffice for our purposes.

As you write you book, save a copy as a standard DOC or DOCX document file. Stop and save your file every hour or so. This will assure that you don’t lose your work if the computer crashes or you run out of power when unplugged.

In this example, we will use the file name My Great Novel.docx. We will store this in our default Windows Documents folder. This is your master copy where you will make all future edits. One of the great things about publishing online is that you can change the book after it is released, upload a new copy, and from that point forward anyone who downloads the book will see the changes. If Kindle users have selected to accept revisions, the new copy will appear on their Kindle reader or their desktop or mobile app automatically.

Let’s use the File Manger or equivalent on your brand of computer to inspect the Documents folder where the file is stored. Click the File Manager icon along the bottom of the screen.


The File Manager will open. Select the Documents folder from the left hand window pane. You will see the file for the book in a list along with the type of file it is and the date it was created. The kind of file is shown as Microsoft Word File under the Type column. If you don’t see the menu on the top of the screen, press the ALT key and it will appear.


For this exercise, you will need to display the files in this folder using Detail view. Click the View tab in the meny and click the Detail button. By default, file extensions associated with applications loaded on your computer, such as docx for Word documents, are hidden. To display the file extension with the file name, check the File Name Extensions box. At any rate, you will always be able to tell each file’s kind under the Type column.


To prepare the file for uploading to KDP, return to the Word window and click the File tab, then Save As. A dialog box will appear.


From here, you can specify the folder to save the file to, give it a name and specify the format the file is to be saved as. Select the file format Web Page Filtered by clicking the Save as type drop-down box. Make certain to select the filtered option and not the other web sections. When you save the document, it will create a file with the same name as the document file but with a file extension of HTM. It will also create a new sub-folder below Documents.

Close Word and go back to the File Manager.


Notice that we have two files named My Great Novel, but they are not the same. One is the original Microsoft Word Document file with a DOCX file extension (hidden in this view) and the other is a Firefox HTML Document with a hidden file extension of HTM. I use the Firefox browser. If you use another browser the Type will be different. For instance, in Chrome, your default browser, the file type will be Chrome HTM Document. If you check the File Name Extensions box under the File tab, you will see the file extensions as part of the file name.

The sub-folder My Great Novel_files under Documents was created automatically. It has the same name as the file with the characters _file added at the end. This sub-folder contains all of the images in the original document file saved as JPG files. This extension represents a specific format for holding images. It’s official name is the Joint Photographic Experts Group. Let’s double click on this new folder to see what’s inside.


Here we are looking at the sub-folder in the Large Icons view so we can see what the images look like. Every image that was in the original DOCX document was stripped out and turned into a JPG file. Each was given the name image with a sequential number appended to it.

The HTM file contains only the text of the book and links to the sub-folder where the images are stored. We need to put the text and images together in a single file that we can upload to KDP. First, highlight the HTM document in the Documents folder and cut it. Then paste it into the sub-folder that has _files appended to the end of it. In this example, the sub-folder is named My Great Novel_files. You will see a warning when you do this.


This is telling you that the HTM file has embedded references to images in the sub-folder. We will take care of this in a moment. Click Cancel to close the warning.

We now have the HTM document file and JPG image files together in one place, but they are not yet linked together yet. Open the HTM Document file.


Notice that we see the text but the images are missing. This is because there are special markers in the HTM file called image tags that tell the browser where to go in order to find the pictures. Because we moved the HTM document to the sub-folder My Great Novel_files where the images are, it is now looking for another sub-sub-folder below the current one to find the photos. We need to open the HTM document file with a text editor to make adjustments. We will use Notepad, though you can use any text editor. Do not open the file with a word processing program such as Word. Word processing programs add invisible formatting character that will make the file unreadable by a browser. Here is what the file looks like when opened in a text editor.


This is the internal Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) code that tells a browser how to display the page. Don’t panic! There is no need need to know how to write HTML code. You only have to change one thing.

HTML code is made up of text and control tags. These are bound by the less than and greeter than symbols < >. One of these control tags specifies the graphic images to be displayed. Text and images are what are displayed in a browser. Tags tell browsers how to format those text and images.

All eBooks, both Kindle and ePub, are just modified HTML files. KDP will build a Kindle edition of your book from the HTML file that you upload.

We only need to change the tag that controls the placement images on the page. That is the image tag and it is written as <img. Click Edit on the Notepad menu and then Search. The search dialog box will appear.


Enter <img for Find what and click the Find next button. You will be moved in the file to the first image tag.


Notice that the characters for <img have been highlighted. Image tags contain attributes that control how the tag will behave. Look at the line below to the attribute named src that stands for source. It tells the browser where the image file is stored so it can retrieve it and place it at this spot on the web page. There are other attributes such as width and height that tell the browser the size of the image, but you don’t have to worry about them.

In this case, the src attribute is telling the browser to look in a sub-folder named My%20Great%20Novel_files for a file named image0001. The characters %20 represent a single space to the browser and the slash character / separates the folder name from the file name.

Because we moved the HTM file in the same folder that contains the images, the instructions given to the browser causes it to look in another folder below My Great Novel_files that it thinks is also named My Great Novel_files. No such folder exists. That is why we didn’t see the photos. The browser could not find the non-existent folder so it left blank space holders where the images should have been displayed. We have to tell the browser to look in the same sub-folder where the HTM document is located in order to find the images.

Use the mouse to highlight the characters src=“My%20Great%20Novel_files/image.


Click Edit and Replace. The Replace dialog will appear.


Because you highlighted the text to be changed, it will automatically populate the field named Find what. If not, select Edit and Paste when the cursor is in this field. Type src“=image in the field Replace with. This will look for the text that directs the browser to a sub-sub-folder and replace it with a reference to the same folder where the HTM documents resides. Click Replace All to make the change for every image tag. To confirm this, search for <img again.


The src= attribute points to the file image0001 with no reference to a sub-folder, so the browser will look for the image file in the same folder as the HTM document.

Close notepad and return to the My Great Novel_files sub-folder. We see the HTM document and the image files together in one place.


If we open the HTM document. We will see the text and photos together.


Now, we have to put these files together into a format that can be uploaded to KDP by placing them inside a ZIP file. I use WinZip, but you can use any ZIP program including the one that comes with Windows 10. The ZIP file will now be in the folder using the same name as the HTM Document but with a ZIP file extension.


It is this ZIP file that you upload to KDP. Amazon will unzip it and put everything together in a Kindle edition. Upload your cover art or select one from KDP. Once your text and cover are uploaded, make certain to check the result by launching the previewer. Page through the entire book to make certain that it is formatted correctly. If you find an error, go back to the original DOCX document and make the necessary adjustments. Then follow the steps above to produce a new ZIP file and upload that.

You can also use this ZIP file to produce MOBI and ePub files on your local computer using programs like Calibre.

By following these steps, you will gain control over the look and feel of your Kindle edition to produce a quality book.

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